Resources

DISCLAIMER: These are referrals ONLY and we are not making any recommendations

Do you need assistance with keeping your pet?

Contact The ASPCA: (844) 533-7738

The ASPCA safety net programs provide alternatives to pet parents who may otherwise surrender their pets to animal shelters.

Areas of focus for safety net programs vary, ranging from pet food banks to financial assistance for veterinary bills to temporary housing for animals.

Here are a few methods employed by safety net programs to help keep pets in their homes:

  • Pet food banks
  • Community vaccination clinics, spay/neuter services, collars, tags and flea treatment.
  • Behavior classes
  • Temporary housing for animals whose pet parents are in crisis, such as in cases of homelessness or domestic violence.
  • Assistance with housing issues, such as helping to pay a pet deposit fee.

The inclusion of a service, organization or program in this listing is NOT an endorsement or recommendation. We have no affiliation with any of the organizations or programs listed. We strongly suggest you evaluate each group and review carefully their policies and requirements before applying. Please also note that some of these programs require that the request be made prior to the animal being treated, and that most programs are limited in the amount they can grant for a specific request. Generally, grants are between $25 – 500, so it’s important to check with several sources and to also try to raise funds yourself.

Care Credit personal line of credit for healthcare treatments and procedures for your entire family, including your pets.
www.carecredit.com

Free Animal Doctor helps owners and rescue groups get funding for their pets medical treatment.
www.freeanimaldoctor.org

In Memory of Magic (IMOM) is dedicated to insuring that no companion animal has to be euthanized simply because his or her caretaker is financially challenged. Request must be made before animal is treated.
www.imom.org  |  Phone: 866-230-2164

RedRover Relief (formerly LifeLine Grants) The RedRover Relief program provides funding to Good Samaritans, animal rescuers and pet owners to help them care for animals in life-threatening situations.
www.uan.org  |  Phone: 916-429-2457

Ozzy Foundation helps pet guardians with the financial costs of veterinarian bills and provides a supportive place for those caring for a chronically-ill pet.
ozzyfoundation.org

Angels 4 Animals working together with vet clinics and owners Angels 4 Animals Guardian Angel Program helps pet owners with financial assistance for a sick or injured pet.
www.angels4animals.org/programs.html  |  Phone: 916-941-9119

Brown Dog Foundation dedicated to helping families who find themselves in a temporary financial crisis at the same time their pet requires life-saving treatment or life-sustaining medications.
www.browndogfoundation.org/home

Canine Cancer Awareness provides assistance with veterinary care for dogs with cancer whose families are financially unable to provide treatment.
caninecancerawareness.org/

Muffin Diabetic Pets Association assists pets with diabetes.
http://www.petdiabetes.net/fund/

The Mosby Foundation assists in the care of critically sick, injured, abused and neglected dogs through financial support and public education.
http://www.themosbyfoundation.org/who.html

Magic Bullet Fund (Cancer) helps people who have made room in their homes and hearts for a canine companion, but do not have the financial resources to provide cancer treatment.
www.themagicbulletfund.org/ 

Help-A-Pet is a nonprofit organization which provides financial assistance for the medical care of pets whose owners are unable to afford the expense.
www.help-a-pet.org  |  Phone: 630-986-9504

Riley Rolph Animal Rescue Foundation provides financial assistance to existing, reputable animal rescues and raises awareness for animal welfare through its information resource network.
www.rileysrescue.org

The Pet Fund May not be able to approve emergency care funding prior to treatment, due to time delay in processing requests.
thepetfund.com   |  Phone: 916-443-6007

Labrador Harbor provides financial assistance for owners and rescue organizations caring for Labrador Retrievers in need of non-routine veterinary care.
http://www.labradorharbor.org/guidelines.html

Actors and Others for Animals is a Southern California community-based organization serving the greater Los Angeles area. Among other services, the organization provides financial assistance for emergency medical procedures for those of limited income.
www.actorsandothers.com/emergencyhelp.html   |  Phone: 818-897-8760

Animal Rescue Foundation of Dana Point (ARF) (services may be limited to spay/neuter assistance)
www.petprojectfoundation.org  |  Phone: 949-240-2899

Four Legged Friends Foundation’s Sunny Day Fund provides veterinary assistance for low income people in Los Angeles.
http://www.flff.org/sunnyday.html   |   Phone: 310-441-2888

Mercy Crusade Spay & Neuter Clinic of Ventura County is dedicated to ending pet overpopulation.
dogcatfix.com   |   Phone: 818-597-2926 or 805-278-4433

Pet Assistance Foundation
petassistancefoundation.org   |   Phone: 877-772-9738

Holiday Humane Society (private hospital, offers some of the lowest cost services in LA, covers basic procedures only)
Phone: 818-765-8196

Pet Orphans of Southern California – program for individual rescuers, helps primarily with spay/neuter, vaccinations, adoption events. Also has “Good Samaritan Fund,” to assist with medical emergencies, as funds are available.
www.petorphans.org   |  Phone: 818-901-0190

The Sam Simon Foundation provides low cost or free non-orthopedic surgeries to low income residents of Los Angeles.
www.samsimonfoundation.com/surgeryClinic.asp   |   Phone: 1-888-364-7729

Voice for the Animals Foundation Helping Friends Program helps seniors, people with disabilities, terminal illnesses or fixed incomes take care of their pets.
www.vftafoundation.org/    |   Phone: 310-392-5153

Labrador Lifeline Aids purebred Labrador Retrievers in need of urgent medical care, or other assistance in order to live a full and productive life.
www.labradorlifeline.org

LabMed helps rescued Labradors in need of medical attention.
www.labmed.org (Rescue Only)

HandicappedPets.com
www.handicappedpets.com

Peter Zippi Memorial Fund provides assistance for spaying or neutering of domestic and feral cats, dogs and other animals.
www.peterzippifund.org/spay-neuter

Paws/LA provides services to assist low-income seniors and people disabled by a life-threatening illness to help them keep and care for their pets.
www.pawsla.org

Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance provides financial assistance to cat and kitten guardians who are unable to afford veterinary services in life-threatening situations.
www.fveap.org

Sue Freeman’s Guide to Rescue Cats website contains a list of pet financial-assistance resources in Los Angeles and the surrounding area.
www.rescueguide.com/aid.html

Please use this map to help find a spay/neuter clinic or veterinary hospital near you.

[STORE-LOCATOR]

Mobile spay/neuter clinics & other assistance:

Actors & Others for Animals
818-755-6045 or 818-755-6323
www.actorsandothers.com

Amanda Foundation
888-FIX-PETT (888-349-7388)
www.amandafoundation.org

ASPCA Safety Net
844-533-7738
www.aspca.org
Emergency assistance with vet bills, pet food banks, vet clinics, temporary housing, etc.

Best Friends Pet Adoption and Spay/Neuter Center
818-643-3989
www.bestfriends.org/la
Free low-cost spay/neuter (cost of surgery is dependent on applicant’s income)

County of Los Angeles Animal Services
562-345-0321
www.animalcare.lacounty.gov
Spay/neuter vouchers to qualifying residents of the County of LA

Downtown Dog Rescue
213-403-0129
http://downtowndogrescue.org
Low-cost spay/neuter & medical, adoption, pet supplies, grooming, financial aid, housing that accepts pets, etc.

FixNation
818-524-2287
www.fixnation.org
Free spay/neuter for feral cats and low-cost spay/neuter for tame cats

The HSUS Pets For Life Program
1-888-837-3193
www.humanesociety.org/petsforlife
Offering free veterinary care and dog training in under-served communities in Los Angeles
90031 – Lincoln Heights
90032 – El Sereno
90033 – Boyle Heights
90063 – City Terrace
90022 – East LA (unincorporated)
90023 – East LA (unincorporated)

Los Angeles Animal Services
213-482-9532
www.laanimalservices.org
Spay/Neuter vouchers for pets qualifying residents in the city of LA

Lucy Pet Foundation
855-499-LUCY (888-499-5829)
www.lucypetfoundation.org
Provides spay/neuter, vaccines and microchipping in a mobile unit

Pet Assistance Foundation
877-SPAY-PET (877-772-9738)
www.petassistancefoundation.org
12 branches assisting people with low-cost spay/neuter

Riley’s Rescue
805-490-9922
www.rileysrescue.org
Mobile Clinic – FREE sterilizations in Oxnard, CA

Sam Simon Foundation
888-DOG-SPAY (888-364-7729)
www.ssfmobileclinic.org
Free spay/neuter & other services for pets belonging to families who earn less than $40,000 per year

SNP LA
310-574-5555
www.snpla.org
Low-cost spay/neuter in Downey, Pico Rivera & Van Nuys; additional services in Pico Rivera

Spay-4-LA
1-888-SPAY-4-LA (772-9452)
www.1888spay4la.org
Spay & neuter service for cats and dogs.

Spay California
866-PET-SPAY (866-738-7729)
www.spayCalifornia.org (for CA referrals)
www.spayusa.org (for nation-wide referrals)
A state-wide referral network/database to connect people throughout the State of California with participating programs and veterinarians offering low cost spay/neuter services

Whether you’ve lost a pet, are looking to adopt a new animal friend, or hoping to give time back as a volunteer, Los Angeles area shelters are a great place to start.


LA CITY SHELTERS:

1.) East Valley– 14409 Vanowen St, Van Nuys CA 91405
2.) Harbor Area– 735 Battery St. San Pedro 90731
3.) West LA– 11361 West Pico Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90025
4.) North Central– 3201 Lacy St. Los Angeles 90031
5.) South Central– 1850 W 60th St, Los Angeles, CA 90047
6.) West Valley– 20655 Plummer St. Chatsworth 91311

LA COUNTY SHELTERS:

1.) Agoura Hills– 29525 Agoura Rd. Agoura 91301
2.) Baldwin Park– 4275 N. Elton Baldwin Park 91706
3.) Carson– 216 W. Victoria St. Gardena 90248
4.) Castaic– 31044 N. Charlie Cyn Rd. Castaic 91384
5.) Downey– 11258 S. Garfield Ave. Downey 90242
6.) Lancaster– 5210 W. Ave. I Lancaster 93536

 

OTHER LOCAL SHELTERS:

Burbank Animal Shelter
1150 N. Victory Place Burbank, CA 91502

Camarillo Animal Shelter
600 Aviation Drive Camarillo, CA 93010

Glendale Humane Society
717 W. Ivy Street, Glendale, CA 91204

NKLA Pet Adoption Center
1845 Pontius Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90025

Orange County Animal Care
561 The City Drive South Orange, CA. 92868

Pasadena Humane Society
361 S. Raymond Ave. Pasadena, CA 91105

SEAACA
9777 Seaaca Street Downey, CA 90241

SPCA-LA
7700 East Spring Street Long Beach, CA 90815
12910 Yukon Avenue Hawthorne, CA 90250


ADOPTION WEBSITES AND SHELTER SEARCH SITES:

Adopt-A-Pet

Animal Shelter Search

Petharbor

Petfinder

 

If you have a furry family member, it can be challenging to find the perfect apartment where you can all live. Apartment List recently published data about the top cities for dog and cat lovers; today, we’re here to help you understand how to find a pet-friendly apartment.

Fees and Restrictions

First, we’ll address the common restrictions and fees that you may face.

Restrictions

Every landlord has a different pet policy, but most have one or more of the following rules for tenants bringing pets:

  • Number of pets: Most apartment buildings limit residents to a total of 2 pets.
  • Weight restrictions: Some apartments do not allow (or may charge additional fees for) dogs over 55 lbs.
  • Aggressive dogs: Many landlords will not allow residents to bring dogs deemed “aggressive”. There’s no set list, but this usually includes Pit Bulls, Dobermans, Rotweillers, German Shepherds, and Great Danes. While your pet may be harmless, most landlords (and insurance companies) find these breeds to be risky tenants!

Pet Fees

In our experience, almost all apartments require tenants to pay a premium for bringing your canine or feline friend along. Some states and cities place limits on these fees, so you may want to research local regulations if your landlord requires payments that are astronomically high. Here are the fees that we commonly see:

Know your rights

Note that people with disabilities have a right to have service or emotional support pets, even if the leasing agreement specifically prohibits pets. You do not have to disclose your disability to the landlord. Additionally, service and emotional support pets are not subject to pet fees.

What you can do

The list of fees and restrictions can be daunting, but Apartment List is here to help! Many landlords and property managers can be flexible with policies as long as you can show that you and your pet are responsible tenants. Here are three strategies to convince your landlord that your pet is a safe bet.

1. Build a pet resume

Building a pet resume is all about showcasing your pet, and makes the screening process faster. Things you can include in your pet’s resume are: photo, description, training certification, health records, habits, grooming. The Peninsula Humane Society provides a good example of what your pet resume can include.  A letter of recommendation from previous landlords and neighbors helps too!

2. Promote yourself and your pet

Let your landlord know you share similar concerns about cleanliness. Express that your pet is potty-trained, vaccinated, flea-controlled, etc. Getting a training certificate like the Canine Good Citizen’s for dogs is a good way to prove to your landlord your pet would be a good tenant.

3. Get insurance for your pet

Liability is a top concern for landlords, and one of the main reasons landlords are against pets. Landlords will feel more comfortable allowing pets if they are insured – this can be especially helpful if you have an aggressive breed. Be sure to find out whether your insurance has a dog bite exclusion, dangerous breed exclusion or other limitations.

Note that most rental insurance companies do not cover dog bites, so you may need to get a separate pet insurance policy.The Federation of Insured Dog Owners will provide canine liability insurance policies for all breeds of dogs.

Finally, we at Apartment List are here to help! You can use our site to search for apartments that allow dogs or cats, making it easy for you to find the perfect place for you and your furry friend. Good luck hunting!

Article from: https://www.apartmentlist.com/rentonomics/how-to-find-a-pet-friendly-apartment

“The Financial Benefits of Adopting a Pet: You Can Help End Pet Homelessness”.

https://www.thesimpledollar.com/financial-benefits-to-adopting-a-pet/

Overcrowding is a serious problem in America’s animal shelters. According to the ASPCA, an estimated 1.5 million animals are euthanized every year due to overcrowding — and that’s only dogs and cats.

If you’re considering bringing home a pet in the new year, adopting your furry friend from a shelter can help alleviate this growing problem. You’re also helping end pet homelessness, unhealthy breeding techniques and puppy mills, which subject more than 2 million dogs to devastating and inhumane conditions every year.

As if that weren’t enough, you can actually save money by adopting over shopping. Breeders and pet stores come with considerably higher costs — both up front and over the life of your pet — especially when compared to animal shelters and rescue organizations.

Saving Through Adoption

Adopting your pet from a rescue group or shelter can save you significantly up front. Breeders typically charge $1,000 or more for their pure-bred animals, and pet stores are equally as expensive. What’s worse, these fees rarely include the costly vaccinations, spay or neuter surgery and initial medications that the newly purchased animals need.

Though shelters and rescue organizations may charge an adoption fee, it typically covers the following services:

  • Initial Vaccinations & Wellness Exam – $150-$200
  • Flea treatment – $50-$200
  • Microchipping and registration – $50
  • Heartworm testing and medication – $15-$700
  • Spay or Neuter Surgery – $150-$300

The adoption fee may also cover the cost to treat an animal that arrived at the shelter with a pre-existing injury or illness, something that isn’t typically covered by a breeder.